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Filisur - sheet 1216

Whenever we go hiking we almost always find that our route lies on more than one map. It’s like dropping buttered toast – it almost always lands on the buttered side!. This is why we conceived the idea of visiting the four corners of the Filisur national map sheet (sheet 1216).

Division of sheets of the 1:25,000 national map
Extract from the national map with perimeters and numbers of the 1:25,000 national map sheets

What can we see there? How do we reach these locations? It is astonishing how much the landscape can change in an area of 17.5 x 12.0 kilometres. The corners are at an altitude ranging from1,625 up to 2,270 metres above sea level.

How did this division into map sheets come about? The book on the history of the 1864 Dufour map contains a chapter dealing with this topic. Dufour created the division into sheets for the 1:100,000 map. For Switzerland, it comprised 5 x 5 sheets measuring 70 x 48 centimetres. And the maps ranging from 1:25,000 to 1:100,000 still have these dimensions today. For the Dufour Map, and later the Siegfried Map, the original 1:50,000 and 1:25,000 field drafts only measured 35 x 24 centimetres.

Today’s division into map sheets was thus introduced by Dufour. Only the numbering and names of the sheets were modified over the years. Later it was also decided to produce all the maps in the same format (unlike the Dufour Map) in scale versions 1:25,000 and 1:50,000 as quarter sheets. Dufour only published 1:100,000 scale maps. His original field drafts were later published in the 1:25,000 and 1:50,000 Siegfried Map, though they were numbered differently there. In the alpine region the 1:50,000 map was used, while 1:25,000 was used in the lowlands.

The coordinates of the map sheet corners and the aspect ratio of the maps remained unchanged throughout the whole period. Only the numbering system and the sheet sizes for the 1:25,000 and 1:50,000 were altered.

Documentation

  • Filisur: sheet 1216
    Who has not embarked on a hiking tour through Switzerland and discovered that their route lies on more than one map? This prompted us to visit the four corners of the Filisur (sheet 1216) map. What is there to see here, and how do we get there? It is astonishing how much a landscape can change in an area of 17.5 by 12 kilometres. The corners lie at an altitude of 1,625 to 2,270 metres above sea level
    PDF, 2 page(s), 184 KB, German

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